Why Should You Try Boxing?

Boxing Is Fun

Enjoying something is probably the number one reason why anybody ever got good at anything. The one thing boxing has over many traditional fitness exercises is the added element of good old plain FUN! If you ever plan to be successful at anything, it helps if you find the experience enjoyable. Otherwise, it becomes work, becomes a chore, and you’ll quit before you ever get a routine going. This is the problem with many traditional workout routines.

Literally EVERYONE we’ve seen that puts on a pair of gloves for the first time has fun. Hitting the focus mitts becomes a game and they enjoy the challenge. There are so many pieces of equipment in the studio and so many skills to master that boxing never becomes boring. Even after the boxing session ends, clients feel inspired to go home and watch videos online to become inspired by other boxers. There are very few exercises that leave this lasting impression. Can you imagine someone going home and fantasizing about burpees? Give boxing a try and you’ll see what we’re talking about.

Boxing Is Challenging & Great For Your Health 
Many people understand that boxing is challenging but have the perception that boxing is going to war, and they imagine themselves having to throw and absorb punches like Rocky. Let me give it to you straight: that’s not the case at Performance Locker. Our classes are for people who do not want to get hit in the face! You will be physically challenged learning how to move efficiently and effectively, all while hitting real targets (not the air). All of our classes are designed for any ability level and everyone is welcome to try! Boxing improves your cardiovascular system, bone density, and helps to reduce stress.
Boxing Improves Confidence
Boxing is a great confidence booster. The sport molds fighters out of average people.

Boxing is challenging but when you overcome those challenges you will feel so confident in yourself that you can do anything that you set your mind to!

Performance Locker offers boxing on Tuesday’s at 6:30pm – Thursday’s at 12pm –
and Saturday’s at 7am. Boxing gloves provided or you can buy your own on-site.

 
Sign Up for Boxing Right Now  » Click Here to Register! 

*Supporting researched provided via an Article by Johnny N from Expert Boxing

Yoga Pose Breakdown: Upward Table Top

Upward Table Top

1. Start in a seated position, bend both knees with soles of the feet firmly planted on the mat. Feet hip distance apart.
2. Place hands behind you, fingers pointed towards your toes, and spread the fingers out. Let both shoulders melt back and lift your heart forward. Stay right there if you are already feeling the stretch.
3. If you wish to deepen the pose inhale engage the core and lift the gluts off the floor until your shoulders, hips, and knees are level like a table top. Stay there for 5 full breaths.
4. Exhale to slowly lower back down onto the mat.
5. Hug your knees into your chest and wrap yourself in a big hug.
6. (Optional) You can lay back and take a few moments for Savasana or Corpse Pose to help your body relax and restore.

Pose Benefits: Upward table top pose stretches the shoulders, chest, and ankles. This pose strengthens the arms, wrists, back, and core.

Common Mistakes: Turning the hands outward. Pushing the ears into the shoulders (do your best to keep the neck long). Sink the hips down in the full version. Caving into the chest.

Deepen your practice follow the link below to register for class:
www.performancelocker.com/yoga/

 Sam Samson RYT 200

Yoga Pose Breakdown: Seated Forward Fold

Seated Forward Fold

  1. Begin seated with legs straight out in front of you and flex through the feet like you’re trying to push your foot flat into a wall.
  2. Inhale lengthen the spine and sweep arms overhead. Reach out through the fingertips and exhale to relax the shoulders.
  3. Inhale to prepare and exhale hinge from the hips as you fold forward. Hands soften to chins, ankles, or around the feet if available. Only go as far as you can keep the spine flat/straight. If the spine curls or rounds back off in the stretch.
  4. Take 5 breaths here and focus on the integrity of your spine. Use inhales to lengthen the back and exhales to melt further into the fold.
  5. To come out safely reach the arms out in front and come back to a tall seated position, hands rest at the heart.

Pose Benefits: Forward bends stretch the hamstrings, spine, and shoulders. This pose can help relieve headaches and stress!

Common Mistakes: Rounding the spine in order to reach the hands closer to the feet. Keeping the feet relaxed when they should be flexed to help stretch the back of the legs & feet.

Like what you see? Click Here to join us for class!

Sam Samson RYT 200

Yoga Pose Breakdown

This Yoga pose breakdown is brought to you by our very own Sam Samson RYT 200hr!

Seated Supine Twist/Lord of the Fishes

1. Begin with both legs out in front of you.
2. Bend right knee and place foot on the inside of the left knee. If you wish to experience a deeper sensation place the foot on the outside of the right knee.
3. Inhale lengthen the spine and wrap the left arm around the right knee opposite hand plants behind you for support.
4. Inhale to lengthen the spine, exhale to deepen the twist. Look over your back shoulder. Take 5 full long breaths here.
5. As you prepare to come out inhale, engage the core and bring torso back to the center. Repeat on the right side of the body.

Pose Benefits: This pose stretches hips, thighs, shoulders, and hamstrings. Twisting postures give the internal organs a much deserved massage. And it feels great after a long day!

Common Mistakes: Slouching/rounding the back once in the twist and crowding the shoulders into the ears. Also, the leg that is extended long on the mat tends to relax when your focused on the twist; instead it should be active to stretch the hamstrings and to stabilize the pose.

Like What You See? » Click Here to Join Us for Class!

Moving with a Purpose to Be More “Human”

Moving with a Purpose to Be More “Human”round logo

Our goal with every person who walks through the door at Performance Locker is to improve their quality of life. Plain and simple. Some people have an idea of what they need and pursue those efforts by utilizing our different departments of performance whether it is Yoga, Pilates, Small Tribe training, Chalkboard training, or more intimate settings like 1 on 1 sessions with pre-selected instructors.

The awesome part about being on our team is that you have a set (sometimes two) of highly trained eyes calculating, assessing, predicting, and evaluating your movement to ultimately give you the tools, teach you the patterns, and hopefully take some of the bodily pain and struggle out of your life.

Why we do what we do:

One of the biggest complements I have ever received as a coach is “I used the hotel gym on vacation and I was so distracted by how poorly this person was squatting it almost derailed my workout. They weren’t loading their hips, their shoulders were hunched and their knees were practically touching one another.”

It’s a warming feeling knowing you’ve connected with another person enough to have taught them something they have applied somewhere else. It goes much deeper than someone lying on the studio floor in a pile of their own fluids after a rowing ladder (but that is pretty rewarding too). Its helping people discover connections that have always been there. Long before that person even existed. These things are primitive, but our modern luxuries have helped us create shortcuts.

If you’ve walked through our doors and participated in a class, chances are very high that you have participated in a Functional Movement Screen (FMS). The results of this screen help us determine any flexibility issues, strength issues, breakdowns in neuromuscular patterns, and you probably left finding new muscle groups you didn’t know existed. Which is 100% our goal.

We use these results to tailor our workouts to you. Some people just aren’t ready to do particular movements with tons of weight at an accelerated pace. Every workout you participate in there is a predetermined common goal, your shoulder mobility may not clear you for pull-ups, but you can plan on hitting those same muscle groups with the same intensity within parameters deemed safe for your body.

We don’t try and cram you into something you aren’t ready for; unlike your toddler who is trying to shove the square block through the circle opening. We build you up to it.

As a team, we have set predetermined algorithms to “move” (pun intended) you towards a common goal. That part of the algorithm might be for you to do the pull-up you’ve always wanted, or to clean up your squat, it might even be to tie your shoes without lower back pain, or reach into the back seat of your car without tweaking your shoulder.

There is a method to our madness. We want you to be the best human you can be. We want to help you build a life without limits.

Your friend,

Coach Ben

Cabin Fever Survival Guide

MarchNewsletterOutdoorWe are very blessed here in Michigan to experience all four seasons. However, winter being the longest of all the seasons it is easy to become bored and stagnant. Here are some creative ideas on how to survive the long days of winter and beat cabin fever.

1. Open the Shades
Let the sunlight into your home! Peel back those curtains and roll up the blinds to enjoy the natural light of the outside world. A cost efficient way to help heat your home and bring brightness to your day.

2. Get Outside
Go for a walk, cross country skiing, hiking, or snow shoeing! Any of these outdoor activities will get your blood pumping and fresh clean air into your lungs. Connecting with nature nourishes the mind and body. Sportsman’s Island, Norway Ridge, or around your neighborhood are all beautiful places to take a walk.

3. Eat Healthy
Eat a variety of bright colored fruits and vegetables. Healthy and nutritious food provides more energy and can help boost your immune system. It is a challenge to get enough vitamin D during this time of year. You can find Vitamin D in some foods like, salmon, tuna, orange juice with added vitamin D, and eggs (specifically the yolk).

4. Lend a Hand
If you find yourself with the winter blues don’t worry we have the cure… Helping others! Volunteering your time and energy to those in need will lift anyone’s spirits. You can volunteer at the Humane Society, The Alpena County Library, Community Mental Health, Woman’s Shelter, local nursing homes, and many more places are always searching for great helpers like you!

5. Think Spring
For those of you who just cannot wait for winter to end, start planning your summer adventures ahead of time! Start your garden early by planting inside. You have all the time you need to research places to visit on your summer adventures and look into all the possibilities for your garden to grow.

6. Be Grateful
Take a few moments each day to practice gratitude for the many wonderful blessings you already have in your life. Everything might not be perfect or exactly what you want.. but you may find you have everything you need. An attitude of gratitude can change your life!

No money required – all you need is an open mind and a little time.
These ideas were inspired by Tisha Tolar’s article from Wise Bread.

Casey’s Christmas List

I want to take a minute to talk about a Christmas tradition that seems to plchristmaspermeate almost every household each season. It seems almost every family has a least 1-2 Christmas movies that are a staple of their holiday season as a time honored tradition. Even though we have watched them every single year for decades and can almost recite from memory, the thought of not watching your film(s) of choice during the season is borderline sacrilege. This year I would like to share with you the Christmas movies that are viewed each year in the Stutzman household, some date back to when I was a kid where as some have become new traditions in the last few years. For the record; this list will include feature films only, TV and Christmas special are not included even though the Grinch (cartoon) and Charlie Brown make multiple appearances each year. So in no particular order here are the top 5 favorite Stutzman Christmas movies! To help we have rated the films below using a number of custom categories using the 5 Christmas Tree system (5 being the best), enjoy ☺

5. “Home Alone”
This is a much of a Holiday movie as “Die Hard” in the sense that the events just happen to take place over Christmas but who am I to question its place on the list of time honored holiday movies. It gives me an excuse to watch Joe Pesci get drilled with paint cans, Daniel Stern take an iron to the face and an immortalized pizza boys running from “tommy gun fire” (firecrackers)

Hilarity * * * * *

Christmas Spirit * * *

Use of “grumbling mumbles” instead of swear words * * * * *

4. “Elf”
With so many amazing Christmas classics it seems to be near impossible for newer films to make the short list of “the best of all time”, “Elf” is the only one to pull it off in my lifetime. This movie was an instant classic the second it hit theaters. It is equal parts humor, heart and Christmas cheer as you navigate new adventures with Buddy the elf from traveling through the candy cane forest to adventures in the mail room.

Christmas cheer – (scale only goes to 5 so, 6 – that’s saying something)
* * * * * *

Nutrition information – (where else can you learn the 5 basic elf food groups) * * * * *

Smiling * * * * *

3. “Christmas Vacation”
Do I really have to explain this one? If you’ve never seen it I would ask, where you have been hiding the last 30 years. If you don’t like it I would ask “what is it like to be born without a sense of humor?”

Quotable Lines * * * * *

Portrayal of Nightmare Relatives * * * * *

Chevy Chase Performance * * * * *

2. “A Christmas Story”
The funny thing about this classic is even though everybody on the planet has seen it the majority of people have never watched it all the way through. It is entirely possible to see it in pieces over the years as it plays all Christmas Day on TBS. Everything about this movie just works, we watch it every year without fail, anticipating and belly laughing at our favorite lines and scenes each time. *fun fact; the actor who plays Ralphie makes a cameo in “Elf” as the head elf that questions Will Ferrell about his Etch-a-sketch quota early in the movie.

Dialog – (1st class narration) * * * * *

Originality * * * * *

Satisfaction felt when Scott Farkus gets a beat down * * * * *

Leg lamp * * * * *

1. “It’s a Wonderful Life”
This movie has been played on Christmas eve every year since I was in 7th grade. Some years we make it through, some we don’t, but I can’t imagine a year without sitting down to watch this classic. It should be a law that all human beings watch this movie.

Feel good-ness * * * * *

Ability to make anyone cry * * * * *

Lovable characters * * * * *

Teaching us that the richest people are those who are loved by all the people they have touched by being alive

Merry Christmas from our family to yours ☺

— Casey

In Season Recipes for December

In-Season Foods for December:

Artichokes, Arugula, Beets, Bok Choy, Broccoli, Brussels Sprouts, Cabbage, Carrots, Cauliflower, Celery, Chard, Collard Greens, Fennel, Garlic, Herbs, Kale, Leeks, Lettuce, Mushrooms, Mustard Greens, Onions, Parsnips, Sweet Peppers, Radishes Rutabagas, Scallions, Spinach, Sprouts, Winter Squash, Sweet Potatoes, and Turnips..

Mushroom Spinach Artichoke Pasta (One Pot)

What You Need…

  • 12 ounces fettuccine
  • 1 (14-ounce) can quartered artichoke hearts, drained
  • 8 ounces cremini mushrooms, thinly sliced
  • 1 large onion, thinly sliced
  • 2 cloves garlic, thinly sliced
  • 1/2 teaspoon dried basil
  • 1/4 teaspoon dried thyme
  • 1/4 teaspoon crushed red pepper flakes, optional
  • Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper, to taste
  • 2 cups baby spinach
  • 1 cup freshly grated Parmesan
  • 2 tablespoons unsalted butter

How To Make It…

  1. In a large stockpot or Dutch oven over medium high heat, combine fettuccine, artichoke hearts, mushrooms, onion, garlic, basil, thyme, red pepper flakes and 4 1/2 cups water; season with salt and pepper, to taste.
  2. Bring to a boil; reduce heat and simmer, uncovered, until pasta is cooked through and liquid has reduced, about 12-15 minutes.
  3. Stir in spinach, Parmesan and butter until the spinach has wilted, about 2-3 minutes.
  4. Serve immediately.

Roasted Root Vegetables 

What You Need…

  • 1 pound turnips
  • 1 pound rutabagas
  • 1 pound carrots
  • 1 pound parsnips
  • 3 shallots, halved
  • 1/2 cup olive oil
  • 2 tablespoons chopped fresh rosemary
  • 2 teaspoons kosher salt
  • 1 teaspoon black pepper
  • 8 garlic cloves

How To Make It…

  1. Preheat to 400°. Peel first 4 ingredients; cut into 1-inch pieces. (If your carrots are small enough, leave them whole.) Toss with shallots and next 4 ingredients. Place in a single layer in a 17- x 11-inch jelly-roll pan. Bake 30 minutes, stirring halfway through. Add garlic; bake 45 minutes or until tender, stirring at 15-minute intervals.Note: You can prepare 4 hours ahead: Cool in pan 30 minutes or to room temperature; bake at 450° for 10 to 15 minutes or until hot.

Maple Glazed Salmon with Roasted Brussels Sprouts  

What You Need…

How To Make It…

  1. Heat oven to 450° F, with the racks in the upper and lower thirds. On a rimmed baking sheet, toss the Brussels sprouts and onion with the oil, ½ teaspoon salt, and ¼ teaspoon pepper. Roast on the bottom rack, tossing once, until golden and tender, 15 to 20 minutes.
  2. Meanwhile, in a small bowl, mix together the maple syrup, mustard, and ¼ teaspoon each salt and pepper. After the vegetables have cooked for 12 minutes, place the salmon on a second rimmed baking sheet and brush it with the maple mixture. Roast on the top rack until opaque throughout, 6 to 8 minutes.
  3. Serve the salmon with the vegetables and lemon wedges.

Kale with Roasted Beets & Bacon

What You Need…

  • 2 beets (about 14 ounces)
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • Kosher salt and freshly cracked black pepper
  • 6 thick-cut applewood-smoked bacon slices (8 ounces), diced
  • 1 large bunch kale (about 1 1/2 pounds), washed, stemmed and cut into 1-inch pieces
  • 1/3 cup low-sodium chicken stock
  • 4 tablespoons apple cider vinegar

How To Make It…

  1. Preheat the oven to 425 degrees F.
  2. Wash and trim the beets, removing both ends. Place them on a 12-inch square sheet of heavy-duty aluminum foil. Drizzle with the olive oil and season generously with salt and pepper. Seal up the foil packet and roast until the beets are fork-tender, about 1 hour.
  3. In a large skillet over medium heat, cook the bacon until medium-crisp (or however you prefer your bacon). Transfer the bacon to a paper towel-lined plate. Increase the heat to high and add the kale, stirring to coat in the rendered bacon grease. Cover and cook for a few minutes, and then add the chicken stock and 2 tablespoons of the vinegar. Stir to combine, cover and allow to wilt for 6 to 8 minutes.
  4. Peel and cut the beets into chunks and add them to the kale. Stir in the remaining 2 tablespoons vinegar. Add the bacon, stir to combine and season with salt and pepper. Serve immediately.

Why You Should Be Eating with the Seasons

Let’s think back to our ancestors… they only ate what was in season because that was there only choice… but today when we go to the store, every fruit and vegetables can be found regardless of what time of year it is. By consuming foods that are in season we give our bodies a wider variety of vitamins, minerals, and nutrients. Visit the local farmer’s market to get started! You can find out what’s in season, where your food was grown, how it was grown, and who grew it. Freshly picked fruits and vegetables are more nutritious and can eat easier knowing your food didn’t travel 1000’s of miles before reaching the plate. Simply put, Mother Nature knows best; she grows exactly what your body needs, when you need it most. Eating with the Seasons is a simple way to become more in tune and grounded with the world around you. Give it a try and let us know how you feel.

In-Season Recipes November

In Season Recipes for November! 

In-Season Foods for Michigan in November:
Cabbage, Carrots, Cauliflower, Broccoli, Green’s (Mustard, Collards, Kale), Herbs, Peppers, Potatoes, Sweet Potatoes, Squash, and Pumpkins.

Sweet & Sour Beef-Cabbage Soupcabbage-beef-soup

What You Need…
1 tablespoon olive oil
1 pound lean (90% or leaner) ground beef
1 1/2 teaspoons caraway seeds
1 teaspoon dried thyme
2 1/2 cups frozen bell pepper and onion mix, thawed, chopped
1 medium Golden Delicious or other sweet-tart cooking apple, unpeeled, diced
6 cups reduced-sodium beef broth
1 15-ounce can crushed or diced tomatoes
1 1/2 tablespoons honey
1 tablespoon paprika, preferably Hungarian sweet
3 cups coarsely chopped Savoy, or green cabbage
1-2 tablespoons cider vinegar
1/4 teaspoon salt
Freshly ground pepper to taste

How To Make It…
Heat oil in a Dutch oven over medium heat. Add beef, caraway seeds and thyme and cook, stirring and breaking up the beef with a spoon, until it is mostly browned, about 4 minutes. Stir in pepper-onion mix and apple; cook, stirring, for 2 to 3 minutes more.
Stir in broth, tomatoes, honey and paprika and adjust the heat so the mixture boils gently. Cook for 8 to 10 minutes to blend the flavors. Stir in cabbage and cook just until barely tender, 3 to 4 minutes more. Season with vinegar to taste, salt and pepper.

Moo Shu Vegetables moo-shu-broccoli-recipe

What You Need…
3 teaspoons toasted sesame oil, divided
4 large eggs, lightly beaten
2 teaspoons minced fresh ginger
2 cloves garlic, minced
1 12-ounce bag shredded mixed vegetables, such as “rainbow salad” or “broccoli slaw”
2 cups mung bean sprouts
1 bunch scallions, sliced, divided
1 tablespoon reduced-sodium soy sauce
1 tablespoon rice vinegar
2 tablespoons hoisin sauce

How To Make It…
Heat 1 teaspoon oil in a large nonstick skillet over medium heat. Add eggs; cook, stirring gently, until set, 2 to 3 minutes. Remove to a plate.
Wipe out the pan and heat the remaining 2 teaspoons oil over medium heat. Add ginger and garlic and cook, stirring, until softened and fragrant, 1 minute. Add shredded vegetables, bean sprouts, half the sliced scallions, soy sauce and vinegar. Stir to combine. Cover and cook, stirring once or twice, until the vegetables are just tender, about 3 minutes. Add the reserved eggs and hoisin; cook, uncovered, stirring and breaking up the scrambled eggs, until heated through, 1 to 2 minutes. Stir in the remaining scallions and remove from the heat.

Roasted Garlic Cauliflower roasted-caulifloewr

What You Need…
2 tablespoons minced garlic
3 tablespoons olive oil
1 large head cauliflower, separated into florets
1/3 cup grated Parmesan cheese (optional)
salt and black pepper to taste
1 tablespoon chopped fresh parsley

How To Make It…
Preheat the oven to 450 degrees F (220 degrees C). Grease a large casserole dish.
Place the olive oil and garlic in a large resealable bag. Add cauliflower, and shake to mix. Pour into the prepared casserole dish, and season with salt and pepper to taste.
Bake for 25 minutes, stirring halfway through. Top with Parmesan cheese and parsley, and broil for 3 to 5 minutes, until golden brown.

Sweet Potato & Red Pepper Pasta sweet-pot-pasta

What You Need…
8 ounces whole-wheat angel hair pasta
2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil, divided
4 cloves garlic, minced
3 cups shredded, peeled sweet potato, (about 1 medium)
1 large red bell pepper, thinly sliced
1 cup diced plum tomatoes
1/2 cup water
2 tablespoons chopped fresh parsley
1 tablespoon chopped fresh tarragon
1 tablespoon white-wine vinegar, or lemon juice
3/4 teaspoon salt
1/2 cup crumbled goat cheese

How To Make It…
Bring a large pot of water to a boil. Cook pasta until just tender, 4 to 5 minutes or according to package directions.
Meanwhile, place 1 tablespoon oil and garlic in a large skillet. Cook over medium heat, stirring occasionally, until the garlic is sizzling and fragrant, 2 to 5 minutes. Add sweet potato, bell pepper, tomatoes and water and cook, stirring occasionally, until the bell pepper is tender-crisp, 5 to 7 minutes. Remove from the heat; cover and keep warm.
Drain the pasta, reserving 1/2 cup of the cooking water. Return the pasta to the pot. Add the vegetable mixture, the remaining 1 tablespoon oil, parsley, tarragon, vinegar (or lemon juice), salt and cheese; toss to combine. Add the reserved pasta water, 2 tablespoons at a time, to achieve the desired consistency.

Why You Should Be Eating with the Seasons
Let’s think back to our ancestors… they only ate what was in season because that was there only choice… but today when we go to the store, every fruit and vegetables can be found regardless of what time of year it is. By consuming foods that are in season we give our bodies a wider variety of vitamins, minerals, and nutrients. Visit the local farmer’s market to get started! You can find out what’s in season, where your food was grown, how it was grown, and who grew it. Freshly picked fruits and vegetables are more nutritious and can eat easier knowing your food didn’t travel 1000’s of miles before reaching the plate. Simply put, Mother Nature knows best; she grows exactly what your body needs, when you need it most. Eating with the Seasons is a simple way to become more in tune and grounded with the world around you. Give it a try and let us know how you feel.

Yoga Poses for Post-Raking

Raking can take a toll on your body; The constant repetitive movement can leave you feeling soar and achy for days. After Mind Body Instructor Sam Samson RYT 200hr raked her yard, she was reminded how much work it takes and aware of how much it effects the body! She knew she wasn’t alone, so she designed this short & sweet flow of Yoga poses to help combat the soreness that follows raking. (Click the photos to enlarge them)

Easy Pose

Begin in a comfortable seated position. Close your eyes and focus on your breath. Let it come in and out through the nose. Take slow inhales and an even slower exhales. Notice as you breathe in the chest rises and as you exhale it sinks back down. After 12-5 breaths let your eyes softly blink open. Easy pose calms the brain, strengthens the back, and stretches the knees and ankles.

Neck Stretch with Hand Circles

Stay in a seated position. Drop chin down to chest. Let your chin move left to right, side to side, imagine you’re painting a big smiley face on the front of the body. Do this several times. Now pause when your chin is on the left side and let the left ear hover above your shoulder walk the opposite hand out as far as it can go. Lift that hand and draw circles with it. Come back to the chin in the center of your chest and repeat on the other side.

Cat & Cow 

Move into table top (on hands & knees) Inhale drop the belly, gaze up, open the chest, and roll the arms open. Exhale tuck the tail bone, round the back, hug navel into spine, drop head & neck, and gaze up at your heart. Cat and Cow stretches the back torso and neck; it also provides a gentle massage into the spine and belly organs. Repeat this cycle 5 times.

Thread the Needle

Begin in table top. Raise right arm and finger tips to the sky. Thread your right arm beneath the left. Bend your left elbow so your right shoulder/arm/head can rest onto the mat. Take 5 breaths here and take your time easing out of the pose. Repeat on the left side.

Puppy’s Pose

Return to table top. Reach arms towards to top of the mat so they are fully extend.
Keep hips over your knees and lower your forehead to the ground.
Puppy’s pose stretches the spine and shoulders. Take 5-10 breaths here.

Savasana (Corpse Pose)  

Lay down onto your back. Keep neck long and chin tucked. Create space for your underarms to breathe. 
Let your body feel heavy here. Feet rest towards the corners of your mat and can fall open in opposite directions.
Close your eyes and focus on your breath. Stay here for 5-10 minutes. Savasana naturally boosts the immune system
and restores the body’s energy by calming the nervous system; which is perfect for post-raking.

Learn More » Click Here to Sign Up for Class