In Season Recipes

In-Season Foods for June:

Artichokes Arugula Apricots Avocado Asparagus Beans Beets Bok Choy Broccoli Blackberries Blueberries Cactus Pears Cherries Cabbage Carrots Cauliflower Chicory Chives Celery Chard Collard Greens Corn Cucumber Dandelion Greens Fava Beans Fennel Figs Lemons Garlic Green Beans Herbs Horseradish Kale Leeks Lettuce Melons Mushrooms Mustard Greens Necatrines Okra Oranges Onions Potatoes Peaches Peanuts Plums Peas Radishes Raspberries Rutabagas Rhubarb Scallions Spinach Sprouts Shallots Strawberries Summer Squash Tomatoes Turnips

Ponzu Grilled Salmon with Golden Beet Couscous

What You Need…

  • 1 teaspoon extravirgin olive oil
  • 2 tablespoons thinly sliced peeled shallots (about 1 large)
  • 8 ounces small golden beets, thinly sliced, peeled, and quartered (about 1 1/2 cups)
  • 1 cup uncooked Israeli couscous
  • 2 cups water
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 1 cup raw spinach leaves, trimmed
  • Sauce:
  • 1/2 cup fresh orange juice
  • 2 tablespoons brown sugar
  • 3 tablespoons low-sodium soy sauce
  • 2 tablespoons sake (rice wine)
  • 1 tablespoon fresh lime juice
  • 1/2 teaspoon cornstarch
  • 1/8 teaspoon crushed red pepper
  • Remaining ingredients:
  • 4 (6-ounce) salmon fillets with skin (about 1 inch thick)
  • Cooking spray
  • Lime wedges (optional)

How To Make It…

  1. To prepare couscous, heat the olive oil in a large nonstick skillet over medium-high heat. Add shallots and beets; sauté 5 minutes or until shallots are tender and just beginning to brown. Stir in couscous; cook 1 minute, stirring frequently. Add water and salt; cover and simmer 8 minutes or until couscous is tender. Remove from heat; stir in spinach. Toss gently until combined and spinach wilts. Keep warm.
  2. To prepare sauce, combine orange juice and next 6 ingredients (through red pepper) in a small saucepan, stirring well with a whisk; bring to a boil over medium-high heat. Cook for 1 minute.
  3. To prepare fish, brush cut sides of fillets with 1/4 cup sauce; place, skin sides up, on grill rack coated with cooking spray. Grill salmon, skin sides up, 2 minutes. Turn salmon fillets; brush with remaining 1/4 cup sauce. Grill 3 minutes or until fish flakes easily when tested with a fork or desired degree of doneness. Serve with couscous and lime wedges, if desired.
  4. Wild Alaskan salmon is in season this time of year, and you can find it in supermarkets and fish markets across the country. Its rich flavor is worth paying a bit more. The ponzu sauce may be made up to a day ahead and refrigerated. Golden beets add sweetness and beautiful color, but don’t stain like red beets. Israeli couscous has lovely pearl-like grains that are much larger than regular couscous. Use regular couscous if you can’t find Israeli.

Heirloom Gazpacho  

What You Need…

  • 2 pounds heirloom tomatoes, coarsely chopped
  • 1 teaspoon chopped garlic
  • 1/2 teaspoon sugar
  • 1 tablespoon sherry vinegar
  • 1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil
  • 1 cup water
  • 1/4 teaspoon sea salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
  • 1 cup finely chopped yellow and orange bell pepper
  • 1/4 cup chopped fresh basil
  • 1/2 pound cooked peeled and deveined large shrimp, coarsely chopped (about 12 shrimp)

How To Make It…

  1. Pulse first 6 ingredients (through water) in a food processor until finely chopped but not smooth. Stir in salt, black pepper, and bell pepper. Ladle into 4 bowls; top with basil and shrimp.
  2. Enjoy!

Filet  Mignon with Roquefort and Red Leaf

What You Need…

Overnight Oats – Blueberry Cobbler 

What You Need…

  • 1/2 plus cup plus 2 tablespoons quick-cooking oats
  • 1/2 cup milk, I used almond but any milk will do
  • 3 tablespoons light brown sugar (I use 2 if I drizzle on extra honey)
  • 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • 1/2 cup fresh blueberries
  • pecans, optional
  • honey, optional

How To Make It…

  1. In a medium bowl, stir together oats, milk, brown sugar, and cinnamon. Fold in blueberries.
  2. Divide evenly between 2 small bowls and cover to refrigerate. Leave in the fridge for at least 5 hours or overnight. Enjoy with a drizzle of honey and your favorite nuts, if desired.

Why You Should Be Eating with the Seasons

Let’s think back to our ancestors… they only ate what was in season because that was there only choice… but today when we go to the store, every fruit and vegetables can be found regardless of what time of year it is. By consuming foods that are in season we give our bodies a wider variety of vitamins, minerals, and nutrients. Visit the local farmer’s market to get started! You can find out what’s in season, where your food was grown, how it was grown, and who grew it. Freshly picked fruits and vegetables are more nutritious and can eat easier knowing your food didn’t travel 1000’s of miles before reaching the plate. Simply put, Mother Nature knows best; she grows exactly what your body needs, when you need it most. Eating with the Seasons is a simple way to become more in tune and grounded with the world around you. Give it a try and let us know how you feel.

Comments are closed